EDITORS

Editor

Leslie Barratt

Roi-Et Rajabhat University, Thailand

Indiana State University, USA

 

 Managing Editor

Dararat Khampusaen

Department of English Language, Humanities and Social Sciences,
 Khon Kaen University, Thailand

 

EDITORIAL REVIEW BOARD

Anchalee Chayanuvat                             Rangsit University  

Jaruda Rajani Na Ayuthaya                    Kasetsart University

Saowadee Kongpetch                             Ubon Ratchathani University

Chongrak Liangpanit                              Khon Kaen University

Poranee Deerajviset                                Khon Kaen University

Unchalee Sermsongsawad                      Rose Marie Academy

Supong Tangkiengsirisin                        Thammasat University

Supakorn Phoocharoensil                        Thammasat University

 

Assistant Editors

Nopporn Sarobol                                  Thammasat University, Thailand

Tarin Pinthong                                      Khon Kaen University, Thailand

Surichai Butcha                                    Khon Kaen University, Thailand

 

EDITORIAL

I am excited to bring you this December 2017 issue of Thailand TESOL Journal. In it, you will find four articles and a book review that highlight the diversity of settings and practices in Thailand and among its Asian neighbors.

The first article of this issue by Osment and Thomas suggests that classrooms should be designed to foster learning. In Affordance rich environments in higher education: Proposing a rubric for classroom design, the authors argue that the design principles used in many pre-schools and Kindergartens for young learners should also be used in language classrooms at higher levels, including university. With numerous photos to illustrate their points, Osment and Thomas argue that language classrooms will engage students if they are dynamic, adaptive, and affordance rich. Hence, such rooms must not be multi-purpose but must, instead, be individualized for each level and age. Their proposed rubric will allow individual schools and teachers to begin to follow their specific suggestions. Strategies for L2 learning are also addressed in the next article, Collaborative and independent writing among adult Thai EFL learners: Verbal interactions, compositions, and attitudes. For this study, participants wrote both independent essays and collaborative essays with a partner. In addition to these documents, participants filled out checklists after each assignment, responded to an in-depth questionnaire, and participated in an individual interview regarding their perceptions toward the two writing conditions. Results of the essays themselves indicated that collaborative essays had higher communicative competence, argumentation, and linguistic appropriateness. Findings of the survey and interview showed that students were more positive about collaborative writing than independent writing.

Strategies for L2 learning are also addressed in the next article, Collaborative and independent writing among adult Thai EFL learners: Verbal interactions, compositions, and attitudes. For this study, participants wrote both independent essays and collaborative essays with a partner. In addition to these documents, participants filled out checklists after each assignment, responded to an in-depth questionnaire, and participated in an individual interview regarding their perceptions toward the two writing conditions. Results of the essays themselves indicated that collaborative essays had higher communicative competence, argumentation, and linguistic appropriateness. Findings of the survey and interview showed that students were more positive about collaborative writing than independent writing

The third article takes us to Bangladesh. Code switching of social class: A study of people in Dhaka City describes a study that compared the code-switching practices among people of different social classes in Dhaka. The findings from recorded conversations indicate that participants in higher social classes used more English and Bangla English while those in the lowest social class used more Bangla dialect. Interviews revealed that code-switching was viewed as evidence of competence and plurilingualism. However, code-switching with English and the use of Bangla-English were seen as having a negative impact on the use of Bangla.

The final article of this issue also concerns the impact of English. In Managing learning English in a Thai context: A big The final article of this issue for Thai students, the purpose was to identify student obstacles to learning English. Using questionnaires and observations of three different groups of students with different majors, the author found that students in the smaller classes were more attentive, more responsible for their own learning, and more accurate and fluent in their English. Regarding the more general question of obstacles, students in all three groups indicated a lack of personal motivation and misguided beliefs about language learning and effective strategies for gaining proficiency.

This issue ends with a review of Avineri (2017) Research methods for language teaching: Inquiry, process and synthesis. In this review Hai provides a summary of each of the book’s sections and chapters that takes the reader through all of the stages of research.

I have provided a short summary of each of this issue’s entries in the hope that you will be motivated to read them carefully. The research in our field is expanding rapidly, so only by reading studies such as these can any of us hope to improve our own knowledge base, our teaching, and our research.

Leslie Barratt

Editor